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Charles R. Conner Museum

Welcome

California Myotis cranium
Measurements on the cranium of a California Myotis Bat.

As part of WSU’s ongoing response to the COVID-19 public health emergency and in accordance with the temporary statewide shutdown of public facilities and recreational centers, including museums, the Ownbey Herbarium is closed to the public through the end of spring semester.

Charles R. Conner Museum of Natural History is one of the most popular of the several museums housed on the campus of Washington State University in Pullman. The Conner Museum’s public exhibit has the largest display of taxidermy mounts of birds and mammals in the Pacific Northwest.

Brief History

Conner Museum traces its beginnings to 1894, when Charles R. Conner, president of the Board of Regents, persuaded the state of Washington to donate its exhibits from the Chicago World’s Fair to the fledgling Washington Agricultural College. Those first exhibits came from a mixture of several disciplines including anthropology, geology, biology, and agriculture. Over time and through the influence of successive curators, the museum’s theme gradually narrowed and focused on vertebrate animals.  Today the museum’s public exhibit includes over 700 mounts of birds and mammals.  The scientific collection used by researchers houses over 60,000 specimens of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.

Magpie feathers
Primary feathers of a Black-billed Magpie

Hours

SUMMER 2021 COVID-19 UPDATE:

The Conner Museum is closed for visitors through the summer.
We will re-open for visitors
Fall 2021.

Thank you for your patience!

Open 7 days/week
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
(Closed on major holidays and during the annual University closure between Christmas Eve and New Years Day)

Admission

Free

Location

South end of the first floor of Abelson Hall

Groups

School groups and tour groups are welcome.  No reservations or advance notice needed.

Contact Information

509-335-3515
connermuseum@wsu.edu


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