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Charles T. Robbins

Field of Study: Grizzly Bear Research
Title: Professor
Degrees: Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca
Homepage:
Office: 373 Eastlick
Email: ctrobbins@wsu.edu
Phone: 509-335-1119
Fax: 509-335-3184
Mailing Address: School of Biological Sciences
Washington State University
POBox 644236
Pullman WA 99164-4236

Research Interests

Research interests: Nutrition and energetics of larger wild mammals. Current research includes 1) use of stable isotopes to determine food habits of living and extinct bears, 2) seasonal fat cycles in bears and how they are influenced by food resources, and 3) foraging, energetics, and habitat use of free-ranging bears. Captive and wild grizzly and black bears are used in these studies.

Representative Publications

Robbins, C.T., L.A. Felicetti, and M. Sponheimer. 2005. The effect of dietary protein quality on nitrogen isotope discrimination in birds and mammals. Oecologia 144:534-540.

Felicetti, L.A., R.O. Rye, C.C. Schwartz, M.A. Haroldson, K.A. Gunther, L. Waits, and C.T. Robbins. 2004. Use of naturally occurring mercury to determine the importance of cutthroat trout to Yellowstone grizzly bears. Canadian Journal of Zoology 82:493-501.

Felicetti, L.A., R.O. Rye, C.C. Schwartz, M.A. Haroldson, K.A. Gunther, D.L. Phillips, and C.T. Robbins. 2003. Use of sulfur and nitrogen stable isotopes to determine the importance of whitebark pine nuts to Yellowstone grizzly bears. Canadian Journal of Zoology 81:763-770.